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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
, a little less groomed than usual, but as you can see, looking like himself. on the left this is ghazi balkiz and john klooister, a long-time nbc news photographer. these three men were able to appear live on the "today" show, fife days after being kidnapped and held in captivity in syria. just hours before this shot of them this morning, they were freed by a syrian rebel group who rescued them from an unknown group that had taken them and that had held them for five, long, horrible days. the rebel group not only rescued these three, they then took responsibility for driving them to the border and getting them safely out of syria. they were in syria in the first place to cover the war there. this is footage of richard's last piece for nbc news before the kidnapping happened. richard and his team are veterans in this field. they've been working together for a decade in just about every corner of the world you can imagine, including long stints covering the war in iraq. also the war in afghanistan. when they filed this report last week from aleppo in syria, they reported that conditions
find that happy spot. we kept each other, as ghazi said. >> we passed messages to each other. we joked around. we weren't allowed to speak. but if you sort of look kind of peek underneath the blindfold, you can see if maybe there is a guard in the room or not. and we tried to joke back and forth and keep our spirits up. >> nbc news chief foreign correspondent richard engel and his crew. >> ghazi balkiz and john kooistra. they were freed after five days after being held by an unknown group inside war-torn syria. what richard said about there being other people held who are not freed. he is right. austin tice is an american reporter who has worked for a number of outlets, including mcclatchy service and the "washington post." he has been missing in syria since august. in all there are 15 journalists who have reported to have gone missing in syria while reporting on this conflict. so far of the 15 only eight have been freed. our richard and ghazi and john are three of them. we and they and their families feel very lucky and very happy tonight that that is the case, even as we continue to
of men ghazi. we have an expeditionary diplomatic corps, and they do face very real risks every day, day in and day out. bad things have happened before, and bad things will happen again, unfortunately, in the future. there will always be a tension between the diplomatic imperative to get outside the wire and the security standards that require our diplomats to work behind high walls and full-body searches. we do not want to conner is tee that wire america off from the world. our challenge is to strike a balance between the necessity of the mission, available resources and toll wraps for risk -- tolerance for risk. we've talked about this on this committee. we've had hearingsings specifically about the design of our embassies, the danger of becoming a fortress america. we need to be safe, but we also need to send the right message to the people that we're trying to reach. i distinctly remember feeling and seeing the difficulty of this in vietnam where villages would examine us suspiciously and give us a stare, an unmistakeable stare that raises many more questions than we're ever able to
qaeda linked terrorists were actually training in eastern libya not far from an ghazi, that seemed to be a hotbed training area for those folks and makes you wonder if the state department believ the president's own press releases rather than what they should have seen on the ground, they shod have been connecting the dots and they failed miserably. lou: pointing out directly al qaeda is far from dead andloe benghazi terrorist attacks. whether it amounts to a whitewash. joining us now is judith miller, former u.s. amassador to the united nations, john bolton. thanyou both for being here. i would like to start with a couple of the findings from the executive summary of this report. these two findings occur with one paragraph. first, embassy tripoli did not demonstrate strong and sustained advocacy with washington for increased security for special mission in benghazi. that means the consulate. lou: here's the other binding ter one paragraph. in the days and months and weeks leading up to it, were inadequate. despite repeated requests and special mission in benghazi and embassy tripo
and foreign policy. a tragedy occurred in benghazi. ghazi is inherently unstable. would that be a fair statement, ambassador burns? you might guess commissary. then ghazi in that. and to this day still in a very unstable place. >> have you read the report chaired by ambassador pickering and admiral mullen? >> i certainly have. >> tobacco include the susan rice for secretary clinton or charlene lamb were responsible, was that the conclusion of this report? >> the report concluded it was terrorists responsible for the deaths of our four colleagues. >> at the report concluded deliberate or less than deliberate effort to cover that fact at any time at the time of the events are subsequently? >> no commissary. >> is it fair perhaps to conclude that in retrospect, mistakes are made within the state department about the allocation of resources and the nature and extent of security that needed to be provided to benghazi? >> is certainly is. it is quite clear and candid in identifying problems that occurred. those problems are unacceptable. we take responsibility for them and we are working ver
that libyans have introduced an alert in the ghazi. on september 9, ambassador stevens requested additional security two days before the attack happened. i knew him quite well. i have a great deal of respect for him. in light of these findings, these are facts that no one has argued. to either of you what to say that you agree with the statements that i have read in the report? >> senator, the statement in the report says that there were no specific tactical threat is a statement i believe to be a statement of fact. you are right to point out the pattern of deteriorating security on each of the incidents you discussed. amongst that deterioration are part of that deterioration was a byan violence.i we did not do a good enough job of connecting the dots of the troubling pattern. >> mr. secretary nides, you agree with the statement he made? for the record, if you could respond i would appreciate it. >> yes, sir, i do. >> the most significant question is not in the report and i would like to get a response to. were the comments of ambassador rice completely in a racket -- inaccurate with the vi
and watched hours of video. we spoke with people who were on the scene in ghazi that i, who were in tripoli, who were in washington. .. >> what they had was not enough. either in benghazi or the overwhelming numbers. frankly, the state department had not given security for personal resources it needed. on that note, let me ask admiral mullen in regards to the specific findings. >> thank you, mr. ambassador, i appreciate that. i do appreciate your leadership throughout this process as well. good afternoon. the board found that the attacks on benghazi were security related. responsibility for the loss of life committee injuries, and damage to u.s. facilities rest completely and solely with the terrorists who conducted the attacks. that does not mean that there are lessons to be learned. the board found that the security posture at the special mission compound was inadequate for the threat environment in benghazi, and in fact, grossly inadequate to deal with the attacks that took place that night. state department bureau that was supporting benghazi had not taken on security is a shared respo
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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